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Welcome toBelmont Community Primary SchoolAchieving excellence, putting children first

Parent Guide

 A Guide To Home Learning 

These are unprecedented times, with a great deal of change to the daily routine and a lot of information to absorb. Please be assured that you are not expected to become teachers and your children aren't expected to learn as they do in school. Their health and happiness is of the greatest importance to us and, like you, we prioritise this above everything else. Although we are sending home weekly Learning Projects and updates from your child's class teacher to help provide structure to the day, there is no pressure or expectation from us - we know how hard you will be finding it. We suggest a minimum of 3 hours per day but this is an ideal time to engage your children in a range of different activities e.g. reading together, cooking, gardening, craft, or learning life skills such as cleaning or sewing.


We are aware that children will be missing out on some learning which would have been taking place in school. When we eventually return to school, please be assured that staff will be adapting their teaching to consider any missed learning during the time we have been closed. 

 

Where to start

  • Be realistic about what you can do - simply providing your children with some structure at home will help them to adapt. For example you could create a timetable for the day - see below for some ideas.
  • Share the load if there are 2 parents at home. Split the day into slots and take turns so you can do your own work.
  • Experiment to start with, then take stock. What's working and what isn't? Ask your children, involve them too.
  • Take care of your own health and well-being. This will be new for your entire household, so give it time to settle.

 

Keep to a timetable wherever possible

  • We recommend you create and stick to a routine if you can. This is what children are used to at school. For example, eat breakfast at the same time and make sure they're dressed before starting the ‘school’ day – avoid staying in pyjamas, as tempting as this may be!
  • Involve your children in setting the timetable where possible. It’s a great opportunity for the older children to manage their own time better and it’ll give them ownership, preparing them for the transition to secondary school.
  • Check in with your children and try to keep to the timetable, but be flexible. If a task/activity is going well or they want more time, let it extend where possible. If they are finding a task hard, leave it and move on. Remember we know that you aren’t teachers and your children may not respond to you in the same way as they would a teacher.
  • Designate a working space if possible; a shared space is a good idea to be able to monitor the activity. At the end of the day have a clear cut-off to signal school time is over.
  • Distinguish between weekdays and weekends, to separate school life and home life as much as possible.

 

Make time for exercise and breaks throughout the day

  • You could start each morning with a PE lesson at 9:00 am with Joe Wicks – he has a daily session live on his YouTube page - or you could join in with one of Mr Togher's fitness sessions on Twitter! Go to his @MrTogherbelmont page find out more.
  • We have put together a timetable of exciting live online events you may enjoy - it can be accessed on our Latest News page. Maybe you could fit some of them into your own family timetable. The list is updated when we hear of something new, so please check back regularly.
  • If you have a garden, use it regularly. If you don’t, try to get out once a day as permitted by the government (households can be together outdoors but 2 metres apart from others).
  • Get your children to write in a diary what they did each day – this can be a clear sign that the ‘school’ day has ended and could be useful to look back on later. Older children might be able to make links between this time and other times in history when diaries have been used for information.

Keep children engaged throughout the day

  • Remember the resources we have provided are there to help, but you can use your own too – there are so many different interactive resources available online. You will find a fantastic selection on the class home learning pages, just click on the appropriate year group to find them. Please also check out the school Twitter pages where teachers regularly post links to great sites and activities.
  • Add some creative time or watch a dance video to get the heart-rate going. Dancing with Oti Mabuse or Body Beats Percussion are tremendous fun!
  • Take part in some of the school events - we're beginning with a super daily Lego challenge! More details about this can be found in the Latest News.
  • Ask them to help you cook and bake.
  • Put aside some special time to share a book. You can also ask relatives to listen to your children read on FaceTime or Skype etc.

 

Being Online

  • Children will probably be watching more TV and spending more time on their electronic devices. We suggest you do set some screen time limits and remind them about how to stay safe online. The website ThinkuKnow has lots of advice to help you do this.
  • It is important to monitor their online activity and encourage them to stay polite and to not share negative comments. Although they aren’t at school, the same level of online behaviour and conduct should be expected. 

 

Looking After Our Mental Health

During this period of home learning, children will be missing their friends and other family members. Keep talking to each other and encourage them to join you in your daily exercise. Although learning from home might seem fun to start with, missing their friends will take it's toll eventually. To support you with this we suggest that you:

  • Encourage your children to use the Zumos website as they would in school.
  • Complete the activities in the Well Being pack sent home via ParentMail. Please click HERE to download. 
  • Share some of the free digital books that are now available online:
    • The Children's Coronavirus Guide issued by the Children's Commissioner which can be found HERE.
    • Coronavirus - A Book For Children, illustrated by the Gruffalo author Alex Scheffler. You can find out more by visiting the Nosy Crow website, www.nosycrow.com and download a copy by clicking HERE.


You can contact your child's class teacher using the contact form on the Class pages of this site. If you have any general questions whilst we are closed, please email us at enquiries@belmont.lincs.sch.uk.


If you have any worries about the safety of a child please click HERE for further advice.

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