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Belmont Community Primary SchoolAchieving excellence, putting children first

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Welcome toBelmont Community Primary SchoolAchieving excellence, putting children first

Art Gallery

Welcome to our Art Gallery! Click on an image for a magnified view.

Reindeer - Reindeer Class

The children decided upon their colours and blended them. They then used a finger to paint the body of the reindeer before adding more detail.

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Penguins - Reindeer Class

The children made and used their own blocks to print their penguin designs.

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The Great Fire Of London - Fallow Class

As part of their learning on the Great Fire of London, the children blended watercolours for the background and created silhouettes of London buildings using black sugar paper.

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Fire Pictures - Elk Class

The children studied the artist Vincent Van Gogh and painted their fire pictures in his style. The painting on the left by Hetty, won FIRST PRIZE in her age category at the Willoughby Open Art Competition. What a wonderful achievement!

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The Blitz - Impala Class
As part of their learning on the Blitz, the children blended watercolours for the background and created intricate silhouettes of London buildings using black sugar paper. 
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Leaf Paintings - Impala Class

Such wonderful attention to detail.

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Printmaking - Barasingha Class

The children first created a design in the style of printmaker, Angie Lewin and then cut and stuck it onto a collagraph plate, which was then varnished. When completely dry, the children had great fun painting the plate which was pressed onto paper to reveal a print. The end results were fantastic!

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Crocus - Barasingha Class

Given a photograph of a crocus, the children focussed on the shapes they could see, how to hold their pencil to sketch and how to blend oil pastels. The results were stunning, as you can see.

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'Bad Egg' - Barasingha Class

The children used charcoal and chalk to draw a character from the animation, 'Bad Egg'. They have really captured the personality of their subject!

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Still Life - Taruca Class

The class studied the artist Georgio Morandi, Itay’s most famous 20th Century still life painter. The children have produced some wonderful still life drawings of their own.

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Teasels, The Lost Words - Taruca Class

"The Lost Words" written by Robert Macfarlane and illustrated by Jackie Morris was the stimulus for both writing and art. The children explored powerful language choices and the effect made on the reader. They gathered words and phrases about teasels, to create their own poems in the style of Robert Macfarlane’s. They then used a range of mixed media techniques to illustrate their work. After sharing on Twitter they received some amazing feedback!

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Grantham Buildings - Taruca Class

The children have drawn buildings from around Grantham inspired by the work of artist Tom Wriglesworth. They explored the ways Tom used line and colour and then created their own. Not only was everyone at Belmont impressed - Tom saw some of the artwork on Twitter and gave it some fantastic feedback: "Wow, these are stunning! Thank you for sharing them with me! I have some serious competition; well done year 5."

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Mythical Beasts - Taruca Class

Inspired by all the Greek myths and legends the class had read in class, they created some gruesome mythical beasts out of clay. They used a “soft-slab” construction technique which uses slabs of clay that have been freshly rolled out and are still damp. These soft slabs can be formed into lovely, flowing structures that are often reminiscent of leather. They draped the clay over hump moulds to create repeatable forms, which allowed them to concentrate more on finishing the form with surface textures and decorations.

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